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Cyberbullying among youth

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Cyberbullying among youth

CANBERRA: The burden of cyberbullying cost Australian taxpayers 30 million Australian dollars (21.9 million U.S. dollars) over four years, according to a report.
A new study published by youth mental health service ReachOut on Saturday revealed that 378,000 Australians aged between 14 and 25 were bullied online in the financial year 2017-18.
Of those 64,000, or 16.9 percent, sought help from a mental health professional and 49,000 visited their General Practitioner (GP), with taxpayers picking up the bill via Australia’s universal health care system, Medicare.
The figure of 30 million Australian dollars was calculated based on the 36.3 Australian dollars (26.5 U.S. dollars) Medicare rebate to patients for a GP visit and 84.8 Australian dollars (62 U.S. dollars) rebate for a psychologist visit.
“The difficulty with cyberbullying is often there’s no escape for young people, with the bullies effectively having a key to every area of their life, including their home,” Ashley De Silva, chief executive of ReachOut, told News Corp  Australia today.
However, the Australian Medical Association (AMA) said that the figure was likely too conservative. Tony Bartone, president of the AMA, said that GPs were being swamped by teenage patients suffering from mental health issues as a result of online harassment.
“We do need to get serious about this. There are enormous gaps in the system,” the president said. Cyberbullying in Australia made international headlines in January when 14-year-old Amy “Dolly” Everett, who was the face of an iconic advertising campaign, took her own life in January after being bullied online.

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Huawei’s founder says world can’t live without it

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BEIJING: The founder of Chinese telecom giant Huawei has hit back at US efforts to blacklist the company, saying defiantly that the world cannot do without Huawei and its “more advanced” technology.

“There’s no way the US can crush us,” Ren Zhengfei said in an interview with the BBC.
“The world cannot leave us because we are more advanced.”

Ren, 74, also denounced as “politically motivated” the December arrest of his daughter, Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou, who is accused of violating US sanctions against Iran and faces an extradition hearing in Canada next month.

“We object to this,” he said.

“But now that we’ve gone down this path, we’ll let the courts settle it.”

The normally media-shy Huawei founder has been forced to step into the limelight in recent months as the company has come under increasing pressure over espionage concerns and the US-led campaign to persuade other countries to ban its technology.

Last year, security concerns prompted Australia to ban Huawei equipment from its future 5G network.

New Zealand has also blocked its largest telecom carrier from using Huawei technology for the next generation network, while the Czech Republic has reportedly excluded it from a 20-million-euro ($22 million) tender to build a tax portal.

US prosecutors are also charging Huawei with stealing trade secrets, saying it offered rewards to employees for stealing technology from other rivals.

Ren shrugged off the growing pressure.

“If the lights go out in the West, the East will still shine,” he said. “America doesn’t represent the world.”

“Even if they persuade more countries not to use us temporarily, we can always downsize and become smaller.”

 

 

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Russia to send tourists to near-Earth orbit on “space yacht”

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Russia to send tourists to near-Earth orbit on "space yacht"

MOSCOW: Russia is developing a “space yacht” that is able to take off from ordinary airfields like an aircraft to send tourists to near-Earth orbit, a chief designer of NPO Aviation and Space Technologies told Sputnik news agency.

A number of private companies are working on the unmanned spacecraft dubbed Selena Space Yacht with the support of the National Technology Initiative’s (NTI) AeroNet and SpaceNet working groups, designer Alexander Begak said in an interview.

“We have an opportunity to land on any airfield, the device lands like an airplane … We now calculate the optimal time for space travel, a comfortable flight path, because experience shows that people do not need to be in zero-gravity condition for as long as 10 minutes,” Begak said, adding that the development of the spacecraft began two years ago.

Three “space yachts” will be produced, with six passenger seats and one pilot seat each. Though the spacecraft will be unmanned, the pilot will be present for the convenience of passengers, Begak said.

The cost of the flight will be about 200,000-300,000 U.S. dollars per person.

Begak said that the first flights may start in five years.

 

 

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South Korea ranks 7th in OECD’s science, technology capabilities scale in 2018

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South Korea ranks 7th in OECD's science technology capabilities scale

SEOUL: South Korea’s science and technology capabilities ranked seventh among other major economies in 2018, a state-run think tank said Monday.

The Korea Institute of S&T Evaluation and Planning (KISTEP) said its evaluation was compared against one done on the 34-member states of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) last year.

The evaluation was based on five categories: research environment, support from both the public and private sectors, quality of work carried out by scientists and engineers, the results of research and overall network capabilities, KISTEP said.

The United States came in first in 2018, followed by Switzerland, Japan, Israel, Germany and the Netherlands, according to the KISTEP.

 

 

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