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FCB bans Indian movie Aiyaary in Pakistan!

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AIMAN INAM

ISLAMABAD: Sources privy to Newspakistan.tv have reported that latest B-town flick titled Aiyaary has been banned here in Pakistan.

According to the details, the Federal Censor Board did not give clearance to the said movie because Siddharth Malhotra and Manoj Bajpayee starrer harbors scenes apropos corruption in the army.

Also, the film portrays Pakistan in negative light.

Readers may recall that another Indian project namely Padman starring Akshay Kumar has previously been banned here as the movie highlights the taboo topic.

It is pertinent to mention here that some six Bollywood movies including Tiger Zinda Hai, Tubelight and Raees did not manage to hit the silver screen in Pakistan last year due to the ban imposed by Federal Censor Board.

Aiyaary is based on the fallout and later face-off amid two Army officers (a mentor and a protégé).

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Lotte to open 20 cinemas in Indonesia

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Lotte to open 20 cinemas in Indonesia

SEOUL: Lotte Cultureworks, the retail giant Lotte Group’s cinema affiliate, has made inroads into Indonesia, with a goal to open 20 movie theaters in the Southeast Asian country by 2020, the company said today.
As the initial step, the operator of Lotte Cinema, one of the biggest South Korea movie theater chains,  recently opened a theater inside Lotte Mart Fatmawati in southern Jakarta. The new outlet has five screens that can accommodate 759 moviegoers. One of them is fitted with recliner seats as a “prestige” room, while another room will be made for children, the company said.
Including two more theaters to open next year, Lotte Cultureworks plans to establish a network of 20 movie theaters in major Indonesian cities by 2010, the company said. In addition, Lotte also plans to go deeper into the Indonesian film industry, launching a business in movie production, distribution, and fund-raising, according to the firm.
As the world’s fourth most populous country, Indonesia has seen its movie industry rapidly burgeon in recent years. A total of 314 films were released in Indonesian movie theaters in 2016, and the number rose to 389 the next year. “Indonesia is a country that has a lot of potential for future development; the country with a population five times more than that of South Korea has only 1,600 screens nationwide, considerably fewer than South Korea (with some 3,000 screens),” Min Joon-key, the head of Lotte Cultureworks’ Indonesian unit, said.

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Showbiz

Priyanka Chopra and Nick Jonas wed 

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NEW DEHLI: Bollywood actress Priyanka Chopra and American singer Nick Jonas hosted an extravagant concert Sunday for their star-studded wedding guests as the couple tied the knot at a lavish Indian palace.
Chopra, 36, and Jonas, 26 performed an opulent Indian music and dance routine as their friends and family clapped along at the Umaid Bhawan Palace in the western city of Jodhpur.
The multi-day festivities – dubbed India’s “wedding of the year” — continued into the night with a Hindu ritual for the superstar couple, who exchanged vows in a Christian ceremony Saturday night.
Chopra said the colorful “sangeet” performance, which featured ornate set changes and dozens of performers, started as a “fierce song and dance competition” between their musical families.
“And what a performance it was. Each family telling our stories through song and dance, filled with lots of laughter and love,” she posted on Instagram Sunday.
They were married in India’s fabled “Blue City” with famous guests including Jonas’s brother Joe Jonas and his fiancee, British actress and “Game of Thrones” star Sophie Turner.
US fashion designer Ralph Lauren said the label had also been involved in the event’s styling. “Ralph Lauren is honored to have dressed the couple as well as the members of their wedding party,” the designer posted on Twitter on Saturday.
The couple got engaged in August, sharing photos on social media showing them performing a prayer ritual in traditional Indian garb.
The wedding celebrations commenced with a traditional Indian “mehndi” ceremony, with Chopra’s arms and legs painted with henna dyes. The bride wore vibrant Indian colors while Jonas was dressed in an embroidered kurta, an elaborate tunic.
That ceremony was capped off with a vibrant fireworks show over the city of Jodhpur – attracting some criticism online as Chopra is a vocal advocate for improving India’s atrocious air pollution.
Chopra – who won the Miss World pageant in 2000 — is one of Bollywood’s most identifiable stars and one of the few to have achieved success in the West. She starred in the ABC thriller series “Quantico” and has released songs with US chart-toppers including Pitbull and The Chainsmokers.
Jonas first found success as a child star, as the frontman of The Jonas Brothers with his two siblings. The brothers hailed from a deeply devout Christian family and presented a wholesome image, including wearing purity rings to promote chastity. In recent years, however, Jonas revamped his image as well as turning to acting.

 

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Music

UNESCO adds reggae music to heritage list

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PORT LOUIS: Reggae music, whose calm, lilting grooves found international fame thanks to artists like Bob Marley, on Thursday won a spot on the United Nations’ list of global cultural treasures.
UNESCO, the world body’s cultural and scientific agency, added the genre that originated in Jamaica to its collection of “intangible cultural heritage” deemed worthy of protection and promotion.
Reggae music’s “contribution to the international discourse on issues of injustice, resistance, love, and humanity underscores the dynamics of the element as being at once cerebral, socio-political, sensual and spiritual,” UNESCO said.
The musical style joined a list of cultural traditions that include the horsemanship of the Spanish Riding School in Vienna, a Mongolian camel-coaxing ritual and Czech puppetry, and more than 300 other traditional practices that range from boat-building, pilgrimages, and cooking.
Reggae emerged in the late 1960s out of Jamaica’s ska and rocksteady genres, also drawing influence from American jazz and blues.
The style quickly became popular in the United States as well as in Britain, where many Jamaican immigrants had moved in the post-WWII years.
It was often championed as a music of the oppressed, with lyrics addressing sociopolitical issues, imprisonment, and inequality.
Reggae also became associated with Rastafarianism, which deified the former Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie and promoted the sacramental use of ganja, or marijuana.
The 1968 single “Do the Reggay” by Toots and the Maytals was the first popular song to use the name, and Marley and his group the Wailers produced classic hits such as “No Woman, No Cry” and “Stir It Up.”
Jamaica applied for reggae’s inclusion on the list this year at a meeting of the UN agency on the island of Mauritius, where 40 proposals were under consideration.
“Reggae is uniquely Jamaican,” said Olivia Grange, the Caribbean island nation’s culture minister, before the vote.
“It is a music that we have created that has penetrated all corners of the world.”

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