Connect with us

USA

White House denies Trump inciting violence against Muslim lawmaker

Published

on

WASHINGTON: The top Democrat in the US Congress ordered a safety review for a Muslim lawmaker and her family Sunday after accusing President Donald Trump of putting her in danger by tweeting a video of her spliced with footage of the 9/11 attacks.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi took time out from an official trip to issue a strong statement urging Trump to remove the clip featuring Minnesota congresswoman Ilhan Omar.

“Following the president’s tweet, I spoke with the sergeant-at-arms to ensure that Capitol Police are conducting a security assessment to safeguard Congresswoman Omar, her family and her staff,” she said.

“The president’s words weigh a ton, and his hateful and inflammatory rhetoric creates real danger. President Trump must take down his disrespectful and dangerous video.”

Trump’s spokeswoman Sarah Sanders, meanwhile, defended the president Sunday against accusations that he was inciting violence toward Omar.

Omar has been at the center of an escalating row after a clip emerged of her characterizing the deadliest attack on US soil as “some people did something.”

On Friday, Trump tweeted a video that juxtaposed the snippet — which Omar’s fellow Democrats say was taken out of context — with images of the hijacked planes used in the attacks crashing into the World Trade Center’s twin towers that once dominated New York’s skyline. Menacing music accompanies Omar’s words.

The clip, which had been viewed more than 9.4 million times as of Sunday afternoon, ends with the words: “SEPTEMBER 11 2001 WE REMEMBER.”

Omar said in a statement posted on Twitter Sunday that many of the increased threats she had received were “directly referencing or replying to the President’s video.”

“Violent crimes and other acts of hate by right-wing extremists and white nationalists are on the rise in this country and around the world,” she said. “We can no longer ignore that they are being encouraged by the occupant of the highest office in the land.”

 

 

 

app

USA

Trumps says Congress ‘can’t impeach’ him

Published

on

Trump administration escalates legal battle against Obamacare

WASHINGTON: US President Donald Trump said Monday that Congress “can’t impeach” him over the findings of the Mueller report into Russian election meddling and his alleged attempts to hamper the investigation.

Defiantly insisting that he did nothing wrong, Trump also denied a portrait of dysfunction in the White House where disobedient aides are said to have saved him from committing obstruction of justice by refusing to carry out his instructions.

Asked by reporters at a White House Easter egg event for children whether the prospect of impeachment worries him, Trump replied: “Not even a little bit.”

“Only high crimes and misdemeanors can lead to impeachment. There were no crimes by me (No Collusion, No Obstruction), so you can’t impeach,” Trump stated earlier on Twitter.

However, Democrats believe the Mueller report has revealed serious wrongdoing by the president and have yet to decide on impeachment.

The report confirmed that Russian operatives had attempted to interfere in the 2016 election to help Trump beat Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton, including by hacking into email accounts.

The report also found that Trump’s campaign took advantage of the impact on Clinton, but did not deliberately reach out to collude with the Russians.

During the probe, Trump repeatedly tried to hamper Mueller’s work, the report said.

But Mueller did not rule one way or the other on whether Trump had committed the crime of obstruction of justice, effectively leaving Congress to take up the matter or not.

Democrats, who control the lower house, are so far mostly holding off from calling for impeachment proceedings, which would be immensely divisive ahead of 2020 presidential elections.

 

 

 

 

 

app

Continue Reading

USA

Half of Americans back stronger role of religion in society

Published

on

NEW YORK: Around half of Americans favor religion playing a greater role in US society, while 18 percent oppose that idea, according to a Pew Research Center study published Monday.

Despite there being a separation of church and state, religion plays a significant part in daily US life: the president traditionally is sworn in using a Bible, while “In God We Trust” is printed on bank notes.

France, Sweden and the Netherlands, meanwhile, posted almost opposite results: 47 percent, 51 percent and 45 percent respectively were opposed to religion playing a key role in society.

Among the 27 countries surveyed in 2018, France (20 percent) and Japan (15 percent) were the countries with the lowest proportion of citizens favoring strengthening religion’s role in society.

Indonesia (85 percent), Kenya (74 percent) and Tunisia (69 percent) came out as the countries most in favor of a bigger place for religion.

The study did not make a distinction between different religions.

In the US, the proportion rose to 61 percent among people aged 50 and over, but dropped to 39 percent among 18 to 29-year-old.

The study was carried out with a representative sample of at least 1,000 people in each country.

 

 

 

 

 

app

Continue Reading

USA

50% Americans support role of religion in society

Published

on

NEW YORK: Around half of Americans favor religion playing a greater role in US society, while 18 percent oppose that idea, according to a Pew Research Center study published Monday.

Despite there being a separation of church and state, religion plays a significant part in daily US life: the president traditionally is sworn in using a Bible, while “In God, We Trust” is printed on banknotes. France, Sweden, and the Netherlands, meanwhile, posted almost opposite results: 47 percent, 51 percent, and 45 percent respectively were opposed to religion playing a key role in society.

Among the 27 countries surveyed in 2018, France (20 percent) and Japan (15 percent) were the countries with the lowest proportion of citizens favoring strengthening religion’s role in society. Indonesia (85 percent), Kenya (74 percent) and Tunisia (69 percent) came out as the countries most in favor of a bigger place for religion.

The study did not make a distinction between different religions. In the US, the proportion rose to 61 percent among people aged 50 and over but dropped to 39 percent among 18 to 29-year-olds. The study was carried out with a representative sample of at least 1,000 people in each country.

 

Continue Reading

News Pakistan Trending